FRANK MILLER Brings Back CARRIE KELLEY For Young Readers Project

Part of a five-project deal including Superman: Year One.

DC Comics on Friday announced that Frank Miller has signed a deal to produce five new projects for the publisher, including the previously announced Superman: Year One, which will debut this summer as part of the new creator-driven DC Black Label line.

But the most compelling part of the announcement is that Miller’s bringing Carrie Kelley back — for a project aimed at young readers.

That’s … interesting.

Ben Caldwell art

Miller, of course, is one of the creators chiefly responsible for comics’ turn in the 1980s from all-ages fare to an industry at times obsessed with grim-and-gritty storytelling. (Then again, he did tell us awhile back that he loves toys made from his creations.)

The artist on the graphic novel is Ben Caldwell  whose bright, cartoony style is perhaps the furthest from what you’d expect from a Miller book, so the juxtaposition is certainly eye-opening.

Caldwell

Carrie Kelley, of course, is Batman’s protégé from the Dark Knight Returns universe. She started out as Robin and later took on other costumed guises but given the context and these images, it appears this is some kind of Teen Wonder adventure.

The untitled project is probably slated for one of DC’s other new labels aimed at young readers – DC Ink or DC Zoom.

Miller don’t shiv, that’s for sure.

Author: Dan Greenfield

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2 Comments

  1. I personally look forward to the Carrie Kelley one more than the Superman Year One, to be honest. I don’t wanna get into trouble for saying that, but I can’t say I mind comics mature from 1986 and onwards, and try to be something more than disposable entertainment for children. Where I live and study, for instance, we never had the same problem about not having stories and comics for kids, as I sensed there’s one back in the States.

    The issue is finding the right balance between the more hardcore stuff meant for older teens and adults my age and the more kid-friendly stories, but American publishers will still stuggle with it for many years to come. I hope it changes for the better and be done sooner than later.

    And not going out of topic, I really think comics should strive to be mature and a fantasy that comments back on our real world when the occasion arises and depending on the creator involved, of course. It’s a mistake to only look and be inspired by the past, because society and the world change constantly, so it’s only logical that comics reflect that as best they can.

    In the case of Miller, I may never forgive him for ASBAR The Boy Wonder, Holy Terror, and his outings with RoboCop in both the original Robocop 2 screenplay and that Robocop v. Terminator from the ’90s, and I mean it when I say how much hate I have for the former two, won’t touch ’em even as a joke. However, it appears Frank has learned his lesson the hard way and may or may not try to make up for his past creative mistakes with these new works. Again, we’ll have to wait and see where this is going, as only time will tell if and how much worse can Miller destroy his own legacy or not.

    Finally, I hope this series will be the first in a series of steps to introduce Carrie Kelley in the main DC Universe, as she is one of the few characters that not that many people know about, and her chance to sign. I really like the father-daughter relationship going on between her and old Bruce Wayne. I am sure Bruce has those same feelings with Dick Grayson, but characters like Batman Beyond’s Terry McGinnis, and Carrie Kelley especially, are a deeper cut for me. I am curious if older Bruce is there for her as a strong father figure for her and she is able to shine more in this story.

    I really, really hope that Carrie will someday join the main DCU proper, if this book is really great and does good business overall. In the meantime, I have to be patient for it, but I could wait a little longer.

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